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The Case for Federalism and Health Care Reform, (with T.R. Marmor), 28 Connecticut Law Review 115 (1995)


Americans are not particularly well-served by their current medical care arrangements. In comparison to all of our major trading partners and competitors, we are less likely to be insured for the cost of care, and the care that we receive is almost certain to be more costly. Although American medicine has produced many "miracles," we are not the undisputed leader in medical innovation, only in the costliness and ubiquity of high-technology medicine" Most of us "covered" by some form of health insurance still worry about its continuation should we or a close family member become seriously ill. Some of us are "locked into" employment we would gladly leave but for the potential catastrophic loss of existing insurance coverage.

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