Document Type

Article

Comments

America: The World’s Mediator? (1999 Daniel J. Meador Lecture), 51 Alabama Law Review 715 (Winter 2000)

Abstract

The end of the Cold War brought about a substantial restructuring
ofmany aspects of the international political system,
including its method for managing disputes. Under the Cold
War's regime of bi-polarity, typically one of the "superpowers"
would line up behind one participant to the dispute and the
other "superpower" would line up behind the other. Bi-polarity
frustrated dispute resolution because each of the disputing
states would then have access to economic and military support,
to the friendship of a permanent member of the Security Council,
and to a network of alliances. The result, most commonly,
was deadlock. The end of the Cold War seemed to bring hopes of
avoiding such paralysis. The United States of America stepped
into a new role, and as "the only remaining superpower" it took
an increasingly active role in managing the disputes of other
states.

Date of Authorship for this Version

2000

Included in

Law Commons

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