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Article

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Book Review: The National Law Library: An Encyclopedia of Law for the Modern Reader, 54 Harvard Law Review 357 (1940)

Abstract

A consideration of these volumes, which has made up in duration what it may have lacked in intensive effort, has brought me to only one sure conclusion, namely, that I should not have undertaken the task of review. For what legal training I have is enough to make me unfitted for the business in hand. I cannot avoid the lawyer's reaction that law books intended primarily for the layman are too epitomized to be satisfying to the legal mind (so-called) and I find, as usual, that I tend to like least the discussion of the subjects about which I think I know most. But no one of my lay friends to whom I appealed for help was willing to act as guinea-pig; not one could be induced to venture beyond the first page or two. Hence I can present only my own undoubtedly biased reactions. In brief, I fear that, notwithstanding some quite attractive features, this series does run into the difficulties which seem to beset all attempts to set forth technical subjects for the benefit of the non-expert. It is at once too good and not good enough--too good to enthrall the lay, and too limited to satisfy the legal, reader.

Date of Authorship for this Version

1940

Keywords

Book Review: The National Law Library: An Encyclopedia of Law for the Modern Reader, 54 Harvard Law Review 357 (1940)

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