Document Type

Book Review

Comments

32 Columbia Law Review 927 (1932)

Abstract

Simon Bolivar and Henry Clay a century ago foresaw the necessity for occasional conferences among the states of the American continent for the consideration of common problems. The idea had an abortive beginning in the rump conference of 1826 at Panama, at which the United States delegates arrived after the adjournment of the conference; but it had a fruitful development after its revival by James G. Blaine in the eighties. Since the First International Conference of American States at Washington in 1889, conferences have met in 1902 (Mexico), 1906 (Rio de Janeiro), 1910 (Buenos Aires), 1923 (Santiago), 1928 (Havana), and out of them have grown numerous supplementary conferences, such as the Washington Conference of 1929 on Arbitration and Conciliation, leading to important treaties.

Date of Authorship for this Version

1932

Keywords

James Brown Scott

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