Document Type

Article

Comments

The Organized Musicians (Part I), 16 U. Chi. L. Rev. 56 (1948)

Abstract

Trade-unionism, which found little favor among most other

white-collar employments until the period of the last depression,

got a substantial start among those employed in the entertainment

industry a half century earlier. One of the oldest and strongest of

the labor unions in that industry is the American Federation of Musicians.

Yet, despite its long and active history, little was known of this organization

outside its own trade circles until very recently. The man in the street

had never heard of the Federation, and standard treatises on labor relations,

keyed to the factory pattern, gave it scant acknowledgment." Within

the past few years, however, six congressional investigations and a

considerable amount of other publicity have given us more information

about the AFM-we now know that its President is James Caesar Petrillo,

that he does not like phonograph records, and that the pundits of

the press are quite uniformly agreed that his middle name is most appropriate.

And on the basis of this information, many have reached the

conclusion that Congress should "do something" about Petrillo and his

organization.

Date of Authorship for this Version

1948

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