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Abstract

Ten years ago, the city of Chattanooga, Tennessee built its own high-speed Internet network, and today Chattanooga's publicly owned Internet infrastructure (''public broadband" or "municipal broadband'? is faster and more affordable than almost anywhere else in the world. In this Article, I make the case for why other communities currently underserved by private broadband providers should consider building their own high-speed broadband networks and treating Internet as an essential public service akin to water or electricity, and I explore means by which these communities can overcome the legal and political hurdles they may face along the way.

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